Description

Chateau Figeac is not an old Bordeaux vineyard. Figeac is an ancient Bordeaux vineyard! In fact, the genesis of the estate can be dated as far back as the second century during the ancient Gallo-Roman period. Over the years, numerous owners have bought and sold different parcels and plots. This is the explanation as to why so many different chateaux in the region have Figeac in their name. Portions of the land were also purchased by neighbouring Pomerol produces like Chateau La Conseillante. One of the largest sections of Figeac was sold to the Ducasse family who used the land for Chateau Cheval Blanc.
The vineyards of Chateau Figeac are planted to different proportions from what you can find in any other Saint Emilion vineyard, and in all of Bordeaux as well. In part, this has a lot to do with the unique fine, gravel based soils. This terroir is uncommon in the Right Bank with its gravel, quartz, iron, clay and sand soils. The 42 hectare vineyard of Chateau Figeac is planted to 40% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Cabernet Franc and 30% Merlot. The increase in the Cabernet Sauvignon marks a change in the vineyard. Those plantings make Figeac one of the most unique vineyards in the Right Bank.
Figeac was the first major estate in the Right Bank to use temperature controlled, stainless steel vats in the fermentation room. This took place in 1971. 

Tasting Notes

Tasted blind at the Southwold Bordeaux tasting. The 2012 Figeac put in a marvelous showing under strict blind conditions and it has clearly blossomed in bottle. It has an immediately engaging bouquet with vivid blackberry and raspberry fruit, wonderful mineralité and fine delineation. This is very composed, with a touch of graphite that almost takes you towards Pauillac rather than Saint Emilion. The palate is medium-bodied with fine tannin, well-judged acidity, harmonious and lively with commendable precision towards the finish. This is a sophisticated and well-crafted Figeac that appears to be on an upward trajectory. Tasted January 2016.
[93 points – Neal Martin – Aug 2016 -robertparker.com ]